Our first coaches corner where you can see us!

We had super fun today on coaches corner; our first time using Skype and I sense that the competition is on now for best hat and mug combo. Mitch won today; with Ian in sensible grown up clothes coming in a firm second.

We have built up a real treasure trove of resources for cyclists and triathletes; so if you are interested in having a listen to other podcasts you can find there here to stream in any format that suits you best and also here on YouTube. I have also detailed many of the podcasts here: (I may have missed a few).

Here is today’s awesome podcast 🙂

Today we discussed:

  • Early (warning) signs of health crashing and tips about what to do to prevent getting sick and return to full form as quickly as possible.
  • Indoor vs outdoor powermeter and what to do with your numbers – also, if you do not have a PM outdoors – how to pace yourself?
  • Theia offers words of wisdom on “failure- or is it?” I felt like she was speaking to my soul given the personal context for me; thanks Theia! Her words are worth listening to. I really enjoyed the tip on  “what am I going to give in a race” and I learnt that for me the importance of holding my health sometimes has far greater meaning in the context of my work and home life. I need to be healthy for what matters; and crushing this in a race just isn’t worth it.
  • Concept of a “Floor” in our Training Peaks numbers – and how to use it.
  • This week in the LAB.

As promised here are my words of advice regarding what to look out for and what to do when your health starts to veer off track:

Warning signs:

I have kept it light hearted; if you wish to read the official consensus on Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of the Overtraining Syndrome: Joint Consensus Statement of the European College of Sport Science and the American College of Sports Medicine click here and another topic close to this and equally concerning is relative energy deficiency in sport and here is the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Consensus Statement on Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S): 2018 update.

Normal warning signs and symptoms that I see when training stress starts to ramp up are the following – without getting too in-depth!

Respiratory tract:

  • Allergies and asthma
  • Sinus infections
  • Head colds
  • Sore/ tickly throats
  • Constant cough
  • If really unlucky chest infections or pneumonia and viral conditions (that don’t need an antibiotic) worsening into bacteria complicated infections (that may need an antibiotic).

Gastrointestinal tract:

  • IBS type symptoms
  • Looser stools
  • Greater difficulty managing nutrition and feeling like food isn’t digesting well
  • Reflux and indigestion
  • More frequent food poisoning / gastritis incidents
  • Poor nutrient absorption – iron and B12 deficiency

(more…)

1 Comment

How to eat for health, longevity and performance….

Be curious:

My title of How to eat implies that I know all the answers to the complex questions of what is the perfect diet and how to eat. The straight up simple answer (from my experience anyhow) is that there is no one absolute and perfect way to eat. To think so is daft and to argue so is closed-minded. How can one diet at all times and phases of life work for so many culturally and geographically diverse people?

We are dynamic beings in an ever changing world, with multiple ‘things’ influencing our health and homeostatic balance at all times; our environment is constantly changing, our stress levels fluctuate alongside our ability to tolerate “stress”, and alongside this the trillions of cells in our gut are in constant dynamic flux alongside us – the beauty of symbiosis. We are complex, food is complex, and health is complex.

I think it is best to say: get curious, learn to be intuitive, take people’s big claims of knowing the definitive answers like a pick and mix adding what you intuitively agree with to your health strategy. Try things but don’t cling blindly to them; test them out and see where it gets you.

I feel it is best to avoid getting overly identified with our style of eating. For example calling ourselves vegan, keto, low carb, Paleo and so on creates limitations on our ability to fluidly adapt to what foods best suit us in the moment. See your diet as food, nourishment, joy and a way to socially connect and seasonally adapt. It’s a cool thing; who doesn’t love food and eating and to do so with freedom is a privilege.

Learn about your body, your ancestry, your environment from the ground up: the soil, wild plants, what you can grow yourself in a vegetable plot, local agriculture, farmers markets and the whole local supply chain.

Ask questions about where the food is coming from. For example is the beef on your plate Irish or an import from Brazil that may be linked with the Amazon forest destruction? Read here. Are your avocados from Mexico? Read more here. To make a positive impact on our world and economies, environment and climate it is important that we get curious about where our food comes from and how is the best way to eat based on where we live and what is available to us. Develop your own ideas and thoughts on this because I don’t feel any one person has the answer here. Do what you can, in your own way.

Learn about the food our oceans and rivers provide. Get to know your food likes and dislikes, be inquisitive about your food cravings and mostly, be flexible because our health needs also change over time.

Veggies from my colleague Ginny Ross’s garden. Ginny manages to juggle a busy practice with a phenomenal veg garden #itcanbedone! http://www.limericksportstherapy.com/

There are many theories proposed about the cause of our current health and obesity epidemics.

Obesity and our growing waist lines are only the tip of the iceberg. We have more autoimmune conditions (The World Incidence and Prevalence of Autoimmune Diseases is Increasing), more allergies (see global atlas of allergy the allergy epidemic section), more digestive problems like inflammatory bowel disease (for example), more cancer and increasing incidence of infertility.

As first world developed nations we have more affluence than ever; and massive numbers of our population are not optimally healthy or experiencing “good” quality of life because they are not well. This is directly linked to the food we eat, the way that it is cooked, how and how much it is processed, lifestyle habits, environmental pollution and the stresses that our modern lives create (in addition to other susceptibility factors such as genetics, gut microbiome, etc.).

I think food and nutrition, activity levels and weight, genetics and environment are very complex and interrelated issues. They cannot be explained by just one theory: we are mind, body, emotions and the memory of all events in our lifetimes. Our health even extends beyond our own control and direct experiences as research shows us that genes are influenced by the stress our mothers experienced before and during pregnancy, what we were fed as an infant and even what our mothers and father ate in the preconception and for the mother during her pregnancy period. if your father smoked this impacts you, if your mum was overweight and so on. Amazing! Generational trauma can also influence our health as far forwards as several generations!

Some things we can change, some we can improve; the rest we cannot worry about and all of us can do our best to nurture and nourish our bodies and minds to our best ability.

A few things I would pay attention to are:

  • Food volume (we eat too much).
  • The balance of food groups on the plate: vegetables should dominate the portion for most of us.
  • When we eat and how much of a gap we give our digestive system (it is good to fast on occasion or more correctly termed intermittent fasting; especially if you have chronic health challenges).
  • Food processing such as refined and high sugar carbohydrates, heat processed/ treated fats, poor quality processed protein, processed vegan or vegetarian foods, burnt or charred foods.
  • Food (and health supplement) quality.
  • Air-miles and country of origin.
  • Animal well-fare, environmental responsibility, fair-trade.
  • Excessive use and hence intake of food additives, pesticides, artificial sweeteners, herbicides, etc.
  • Our exposure to endocrine disrupters, heavy metals (e.g. amalgams, water quality, food quality, local industry, dare I also say food imported from China) and carcinogenic substances.
  • Medication use and its impact on our homeostatic balance in addition to the gut microbiome (e.g. proton pump inhibitors, excessive use of antibiotics or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain killers).
  • Gut health especially in relation to food quality, and diet regimen (low carb or high protein, keto, high carb etc all have consequences for the gut microbiome) and also foreign travel and exposure to parasites and microbes.
  • Stress management, sleep, shift-work, jet-lag, exercise and movement. 
  • And finally our emotional / psychological health.

Our bodies health relies on a delicate balance of so many factors.

A healthy body is resilient, resistant to illness and infections, and adaptive; there are only so many insults that it can take before it all starts to spiral into a mess.

The sooner you pay attention and make changes whilst removing triggers and causes, then the better.

 

Ethical dilemmas:

(more…)

Be curious:

My title of How to eat implies that I know all the answers to the complex questions of what is the perfect diet and how to eat. The straight up simple answer (from my experience anyhow) is that there is no one absolute and perfect way to eat. To think so is daft and to argue so is closed-minded. How can one diet at all times and phases of life work for so many culturally and geographically diverse people?

We are dynamic beings in an ever changing world, with multiple ‘things’ influencing our health and homeostatic balance at all times; our environment is constantly changing, our stress levels fluctuate alongside our ability to tolerate “stress”, and alongside this the trillions of cells in our gut are in constant dynamic flux alongside us – the beauty of symbiosis. We are complex, food is complex, and health is complex.

I think it is best to say: get curious, learn to be intuitive, take people’s big claims of knowing the definitive answers like a pick and mix adding what you intuitively agree with to your health strategy. Try things but don’t cling blindly to them; test them out and see where it gets you.

I feel it is best to avoid getting overly identified with our style of eating. For example calling ourselves vegan, keto, low carb, Paleo and so on creates limitations on our ability to fluidly adapt to what foods best suit us in the moment. See your diet as food, nourishment, joy and a way to socially connect and seasonally adapt. It’s a cool thing; who doesn’t love food and eating and to do so with freedom is a privilege.

Learn about your body, your ancestry, your environment from the ground up: the soil, wild plants, what you can grow yourself in a vegetable plot, local agriculture, farmers markets and the whole local supply chain.

Ask questions about where the food is coming from. For example is the beef on your plate Irish or an import from Brazil that may be linked with the Amazon forest destruction? Read here. Are your avocados from Mexico? Read more here. To make a positive impact on our world and economies, environment and climate it is important that we get curious about where our food comes from and how is the best way to eat based on where we live and what is available to us. Develop your own ideas and thoughts on this because I don’t feel any one person has the answer here. Do what you can, in your own way.

Learn about the food our oceans and rivers provide. Get to know your food likes and dislikes, be inquisitive about your food cravings and mostly, be flexible because our health needs also change over time.

Veggies from my colleague Ginny Ross’s garden. Ginny manages to juggle a busy practice with a phenomenal veg garden #itcanbedone! http://www.limericksportstherapy.com/

There are many theories proposed about the cause of our current health and obesity epidemics.

Obesity and our growing waist lines are only the tip of the iceberg. We have more autoimmune conditions (The World Incidence and Prevalence of Autoimmune Diseases is Increasing), more allergies (see global atlas of allergy the allergy epidemic section), more digestive problems like inflammatory bowel disease (for example), more cancer and increasing incidence of infertility.

As first world developed nations we have more affluence than ever; and massive numbers of our population are not optimally healthy or experiencing “good” quality of life because they are not well. This is directly linked to the food we eat, the way that it is cooked, how and how much it is processed, lifestyle habits, environmental pollution and the stresses that our modern lives create (in addition to other susceptibility factors such as genetics, gut microbiome, etc.).

I think food and nutrition, activity levels and weight, genetics and environment are very complex and interrelated issues. They cannot be explained by just one theory: we are mind, body, emotions and the memory of all events in our lifetimes. Our health even extends beyond our own control and direct experiences as research shows us that genes are influenced by the stress our mothers experienced before and during pregnancy, what we were fed as an infant and even what our mothers and father ate in the preconception and for the mother during her pregnancy period. if your father smoked this impacts you, if your mum was overweight and so on. Amazing! Generational trauma can also influence our health as far forwards as several generations!

Some things we can change, some we can improve; the rest we cannot worry about and all of us can do our best to nurture and nourish our bodies and minds to our best ability.

A few things I would pay attention to are:

  • Food volume (we eat too much).
  • The balance of food groups on the plate: vegetables should dominate the portion for most of us.
  • When we eat and how much of a gap we give our digestive system (it is good to fast on occasion or more correctly termed intermittent fasting; especially if you have chronic health challenges).
  • Food processing such as refined and high sugar carbohydrates, heat processed/ treated fats, poor quality processed protein, processed vegan or vegetarian foods, burnt or charred foods.
  • Food (and health supplement) quality.
  • Air-miles and country of origin.
  • Animal well-fare, environmental responsibility, fair-trade.
  • Excessive use and hence intake of food additives, pesticides, artificial sweeteners, herbicides, etc.
  • Our exposure to endocrine disrupters, heavy metals (e.g. amalgams, water quality, food quality, local industry, dare I also say food imported from China) and carcinogenic substances.
  • Medication use and its impact on our homeostatic balance in addition to the gut microbiome (e.g. proton pump inhibitors, excessive use of antibiotics or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain killers).
  • Gut health especially in relation to food quality, and diet regimen (low carb or high protein, keto, high carb etc all have consequences for the gut microbiome) and also foreign travel and exposure to parasites and microbes.
  • Stress management, sleep, shift-work, jet-lag, exercise and movement. 
  • And finally our emotional / psychological health.

Our bodies health relies on a delicate balance of so many factors.

A healthy body is resilient, resistant to illness and infections, and adaptive; there are only so many insults that it can take before it all starts to spiral into a mess.

The sooner you pay attention and make changes whilst removing triggers and causes, then the better.

 

Ethical dilemmas:

(more…)

Be curious:

My title of How to eat implies that I know all the answers to the complex questions of what is the perfect diet and how to eat. The straight up simple answer (from my experience anyhow) is that there is no one absolute and perfect way to eat. To think so is daft and to argue so is closed-minded. How can one diet at all times and phases of life work for so many culturally and geographically diverse people?

We are dynamic beings in an ever changing world, with multiple ‘things’ influencing our health and homeostatic balance at all times; our environment is constantly changing, our stress levels fluctuate alongside our ability to tolerate “stress”, and alongside this the trillions of cells in our gut are in constant dynamic flux alongside us – the beauty of symbiosis. We are complex, food is complex, and health is complex.

I think it is best to say: get curious, learn to be intuitive, take people’s big claims of knowing the definitive answers like a pick and mix adding what you intuitively agree with to your health strategy. Try things but don’t cling blindly to them; test them out and see where it gets you.

I feel it is best to avoid getting overly identified with our style of eating. For example calling ourselves vegan, keto, low carb, Paleo and so on creates limitations on our ability to fluidly adapt to what foods best suit us in the moment. See your diet as food, nourishment, joy and a way to socially connect and seasonally adapt. It’s a cool thing; who doesn’t love food and eating and to do so with freedom is a privilege.

Learn about your body, your ancestry, your environment from the ground up: the soil, wild plants, what you can grow yourself in a vegetable plot, local agriculture, farmers markets and the whole local supply chain.

Ask questions about where the food is coming from. For example is the beef on your plate Irish or an import from Brazil that may be linked with the Amazon forest destruction? Read here. Are your avocados from Mexico? Read more here. To make a positive impact on our world and economies, environment and climate it is important that we get curious about where our food comes from and how is the best way to eat based on where we live and what is available to us. Develop your own ideas and thoughts on this because I don’t feel any one person has the answer here. Do what you can, in your own way.

Learn about the food our oceans and rivers provide. Get to know your food likes and dislikes, be inquisitive about your food cravings and mostly, be flexible because our health needs also change over time.

Veggies from my colleague Ginny Ross’s garden. Ginny manages to juggle a busy practice with a phenomenal veg garden #itcanbedone! http://www.limericksportstherapy.com/

There are many theories proposed about the cause of our current health and obesity epidemics.

Obesity and our growing waist lines are only the tip of the iceberg. We have more autoimmune conditions (The World Incidence and Prevalence of Autoimmune Diseases is Increasing), more allergies (see global atlas of allergy the allergy epidemic section), more digestive problems like inflammatory bowel disease (for example), more cancer and increasing incidence of infertility.

As first world developed nations we have more affluence than ever; and massive numbers of our population are not optimally healthy or experiencing “good” quality of life because they are not well. This is directly linked to the food we eat, the way that it is cooked, how and how much it is processed, lifestyle habits, environmental pollution and the stresses that our modern lives create (in addition to other susceptibility factors such as genetics, gut microbiome, etc.).

I think food and nutrition, activity levels and weight, genetics and environment are very complex and interrelated issues. They cannot be explained by just one theory: we are mind, body, emotions and the memory of all events in our lifetimes. Our health even extends beyond our own control and direct experiences as research shows us that genes are influenced by the stress our mothers experienced before and during pregnancy, what we were fed as an infant and even what our mothers and father ate in the preconception and for the mother during her pregnancy period. if your father smoked this impacts you, if your mum was overweight and so on. Amazing! Generational trauma can also influence our health as far forwards as several generations!

Some things we can change, some we can improve; the rest we cannot worry about and all of us can do our best to nurture and nourish our bodies and minds to our best ability.

A few things I would pay attention to are:

  • Food volume (we eat too much).
  • The balance of food groups on the plate: vegetables should dominate the portion for most of us.
  • When we eat and how much of a gap we give our digestive system (it is good to fast on occasion or more correctly termed intermittent fasting; especially if you have chronic health challenges).
  • Food processing such as refined and high sugar carbohydrates, heat processed/ treated fats, poor quality processed protein, processed vegan or vegetarian foods, burnt or charred foods.
  • Food (and health supplement) quality.
  • Air-miles and country of origin.
  • Animal well-fare, environmental responsibility, fair-trade.
  • Excessive use and hence intake of food additives, pesticides, artificial sweeteners, herbicides, etc.
  • Our exposure to endocrine disrupters, heavy metals (e.g. amalgams, water quality, food quality, local industry, dare I also say food imported from China) and carcinogenic substances.
  • Medication use and its impact on our homeostatic balance in addition to the gut microbiome (e.g. proton pump inhibitors, excessive use of antibiotics or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain killers).
  • Gut health especially in relation to food quality, and diet regimen (low carb or high protein, keto, high carb etc all have consequences for the gut microbiome) and also foreign travel and exposure to parasites and microbes.
  • Stress management, sleep, shift-work, jet-lag, exercise and movement. 
  • And finally our emotional / psychological health.

Our bodies health relies on a delicate balance of so many factors.

A healthy body is resilient, resistant to illness and infections, and adaptive; there are only so many insults that it can take before it all starts to spiral into a mess.

The sooner you pay attention and make changes whilst removing triggers and causes, then the better.

 

Ethical dilemmas:

(more…)

2 Comments

Lentil, seed, veggie loaf – chuck it together and go

This little loaf worked a treat. I was planning on making lentils burgers, but burgers have a tendency to go dry (and also a loaf is far less messy!). So I had a go at making a loaf and it was so good I made a second one a few days later, changing the ingredients up just a tiny bit.

The loaf is very moist, it can be served with an egg on top if you wanted to raise the protein intake further, or with some melted cheese, or just as it is with lashings of vegetables. I actually have been eating this like bread also as a snack with some cream cheese, or cheese/ butter/ peanut butter; I guess you could call the lentil loaf high protein bread!

Enjoy,
Andrea

Ingredients:

(more…)

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